MAYFLOWER II Returns to Plymouth

Mayflower II at the Sagamore Bridge in Cape Cod Canal on August 7, 2013. Photo: Cape Cod Times/George Brennan

Mayflower II at the Sagamore Bridge in Cape Cod Canal on August 7, 2013. Photo: Cape Cod Times/George Brennan

Mayflower II, a full-scale replica of the original Mayflower, has returned to her home port at the Plymouth waterfront in Plymouth, Mass. The square-rigged vessel left the Fairhaven Shipyard, in Fairhaven, Mass., early on Wednesday, August 7, and onlookers lined the banks of the Cape Cod Canal and watched as the vessel went through the canal at approximately 10 a.m. A homecoming party awaited the ship’s return early that afternoon.

The Mayflower II had been undergoing extensive repairs in dry-dock since January 2013, needing more repairs than initially anticipated. According to the Cape Cod Times, “the ship’s hull and rudder were to be repaired, but once the outer planks were removed, workers saw the need for more extensive repairs to the wooden vessel requiring scarce white oak lumber.” Work will resume on the vessel this coming winter after Plimoth Plantation closes for the season.

Plimoth Plantation states that between now and 2020 the Mayflower II will be “restored to its utmost glory to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ voyage. The magnitude of Mayflower II’s transatlantic voyage, her national recognition and her role as an icon of freedom and hope will ensure her upkeep.”

About the Mayflower II

Mayflower II is a square-rigged vessel that is about 25-feet wide and 106-feet long. She was built in Devon, England and crossed the Atlantic in 1957. The ship was carefully recreated with solid oak timbers, tarred hemp rigging, wood and horn lanterns, and hand-colored maps to give Plimoth Plantation visitors a sense of what the original 17th-century vessel was like. Visitors can climb aboard the vessel and learn about the 1620 voyage of Mayflower, maritime travel, and the tools of 17th-century navigation.